• Philpott and Wilson-Raybould can speak freely on SNC-Lavalin in Commons, says former House law clerk
    News
    CBC

    Philpott and Wilson-Raybould can speak freely on SNC-Lavalin in Commons, says former House law clerk

    For the past 24 hours, opposition MPs in the House of Commons have staged a series of consecutive confidence votes in an effort to pressure the Liberal government to let former attorney general and justice minister Jody Wilson-Raybould answer more questions before a committee of MPs. According to a former law clerk of the House, however, that pressure tactic may not have been necessary: Wilson-Raybould and her former cabinet colleague Jane Philpott — who resigned from cabinet in protest over the government's handling of the SNC-Lavalin file — can say whatever they want in the Commons, without penalty. "If they are speaking in the House, or in a committee proceeding, they are absolutely protected by the law of parliamentary privilege and no legal proceedings of any kind can be brought against them based on what they say in the House or in House committee proceedings," Rob Walsh told host Vassy Kapelos today in an interview with CBC News Network's Power & Politics.

  • Ontario government making changes to controversial autism program
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Ontario government making changes to controversial autism program

    TORONTO — Ontario's social services minister opened the door Thursday to giving more funding to children with more severe autism, which an advocacy group described as a "huge concession" in the province's controversial plan.The new program announced last month by Children, Community and Social Services Minister Lisa MacLeod sparked waves of protests by parents, who said the fact that the funding wouldn't be needs based — instead, dependent only on age and family income — would mean kids would be left without access to the levels of therapy they need. MacLeod said Thursday that the past month has been "incredibly emotional" for families, and she has heard their concerns. "Parents were right when they said that autism is a spectrum and that there are different needs for children on the spectrum," she said. "So for the next few months I'll take their input to best assess how we better support those with complex needs and provide additional supports for them."Laura Kirby-McIntosh, the president of the Ontario Autism Coalition, said the devil will be in the details, but called the news a very positive development."Oh my God, she heard us," Kirby-McIntosh said. "I heard a commitment to move to a system that is needs-based and that doesn't simply give everybody the same amount regardless of need, so that's a huge concession."After a month of sustained protests, emotional outbursts from parents observing question period, and the minister receiving threats — one person was charged by Ottawa police — this announcement takes the temperature down, Kirby-McIntosh said.MacLeod, until now, had been firm in her message that the plan would go ahead as is, and that there was no room to provide additional funding. Next year's budget will be at least $331 million, and she said Thursday that she was prepared to put more money into the program to provide the new needs-based supports, but couldn't say yet how much more."We're prepared to go further to support those enhancements," she said.MacLeod also announced she is eliminating income testing for the program, so all kids under six diagnosed as on the spectrum will receive $20,000 and kids over six will receive $5,000. The plan as originally designed would only give those maximum amounts to families making under $55,000.Intensive therapy can cost up to $80,000 a year and many parents with kids already in government-funded therapy have said they will be unable to cover the difference to keep their kids in full-time therapy.Kids currently receiving government-funded therapy will have their contracts extended by six months, MacLeod said."While we empathize with them, our priority has been and always will be to eliminate the wait list," she said. The government has said there are 23,000 kids on the wait list.Families had also been asking for more services to qualify under the program and MacLeod said Thursday that speech language pathology, physiotherapy and occupational therapy will now be included.NDP critic Monique Taylor criticized the announcement of new consultations with parents less than two weeks before the plan starts April 1."They should have done the work before they made the announcement and put the policy in place," she said. "They've put families in chaos for the last month and a half for no reason."Michelle Costa has been paying out of pocket for therapy for her five-year-old son, who has been on the waiting list for nearly two years. She said she is "cautiously optimistic" about the changes, but giving kids over six a smaller amount of money than younger children still amounts to an age cut-off."Until that major issue is addressed I think people will still remain worried," she said.Kristen Ellison, whose eight-year-old son is currently in government-funded therapy, said the additional six months is a relief. She said she still isn't sure she trusts MacLeod to introduce needs-based changes, but wants to work with her on them."If she were to respond to my email or take my call and say, 'Kristen, I'd love to have you come to the table. I want to understand families better,' I would be there in a heartbeat," Ellison said.Allison Jones, The Canadian Press

  • Chinese smartphone firms jazz up products, seize turf in home market from Apple
    News
    Reuters

    Chinese smartphone firms jazz up products, seize turf in home market from Apple

    "Of those people who are upgrading, there are many switching from Apple to Chinese brands but very few switching from Chinese brands to Apple," said Jiang Ning, who manages a Xiaomi store in the northern province of Shandong. Huawei Technologies Co Ltd, Xiaomi Corp, Oppo and Vivo once sought to grab share in the world's biggest smartphone market with value-for-money devices, but consumer demand for better phones has prompted strategic rethinks. Huawei has had a tie-up with German camera maker Leica since 2016.

  • Week in photos: The images you must see from the week of March 21
    Yahoo Canada News

    Week in photos: The images you must see from the week of March 21

    This week, cultures around the world celebrated the official transition from winter to spring. On the spring equinox, March 20, daytime and nighttime were of approximately equal length all over the planet.  While a scorching sun shone over parts of India and Bangladesh, Papau, Indonesia and central Mozambique were inundated with flood waters. Combined with fiery protests in France and bright green-dyed river in Chicago, it’s been quite a week for photos. Let us know which photos are your favourites in the comments.

  • B.C. legislation targets Trans Mountain, say proponent and Alberta government
    News
    The Canadian Press

    B.C. legislation targets Trans Mountain, say proponent and Alberta government

    Environmental legislation proposed by British Columbia is specifically targeting the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion and would significantly impact it, the project's proponent and the Alberta government argued Thursday. The B.C. Court of Appeal is hearing a reference case that asks whether the government can amend its Environmental Management Act to create a permitting system for companies that increase the amount of heavy oil they're transporting through the province.

  • Suspicion and strife strain Ethiopian plane crash probe
    News
    Reuters

    Suspicion and strife strain Ethiopian plane crash probe

    The office - with three investigators and an annual budget of less than 2.5 million Birr ($89,000) - is leading a multi-party, multi-nation probe into what caused an Ethiopian Airlines flight to crash on March 10, killing all 157 people on board. This modest agency is under intense international scrutiny because the results of its investigation could have far-reaching consequences for the global aviation industry. If the investigators highlight flaws in the 737 MAX 8 that echo a recent crash of the same model in Indonesia, their report could deal a major blow to Boeing, the world's biggest planemaker and a massive U.S. exporter.

  • Canadians react to chocolate-gate
    Yahoo Canada Original Videos

    Canadians react to chocolate-gate

    Prime Minister Justin Trudeau admits to breaking a House of Commons rule by eating food.

  • PCs' carbon-price plan similar to Ottawa's, except for weaker emissions standards
    News
    CBC

    PCs' carbon-price plan similar to Ottawa's, except for weaker emissions standards

    Many of those options — including a price on emissions that go above industry averages, and the earning and trading of emission credits — are strikingly similar to Ottawa's regime, which the previous Liberal government of Brian Gallant adopted. The key difference appears to be a weaker standard for measuring emissions, one that Environment Minister Jeff Carr says recognizes that large industry in the province depends on export markets and can't afford measures that add too much to their costs.

  • 'We are one' says PM Ardern as New Zealand mourns with prayers, silence
    News
    Reuters

    'We are one' says PM Ardern as New Zealand mourns with prayers, silence

    Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern joined about 20,000 people standing quietly at Hagley Park, in front of the Al Noor mosque where most of the victims were killed during Friday prayers last week. "New Zealand mourns with you. Ardern, who swiftly denounced the shooting as terrorism, has announced a ban on military-style semi-automatic and assault rifles.

  • City wants your opinion on Sparks Street refresh
    News
    CBC

    City wants your opinion on Sparks Street refresh

    Mayor Jim Watson unveiled the new designs Thursday afternoon, and the public can view them at a storefront location on Sparks Street. Watson said he believes this attempt to refresh the street will go much better than in the past because all the players are involved, including the city, the National Capital Commission, the federal government and the Sparks Street BIA. Cliff Ladd, a property manager of two buildings near Bank Street on Sparks, said he's concerned the new trees could eat into restaurant patio space.

  • B.C. coroner's report shows 140% increase in homeless deaths in 1 year
    News
    CBC

    B.C. coroner's report shows 140% increase in homeless deaths in 1 year

    A report from the BC Coroners Service shows a significant increase in the number of deaths of homeless individuals in this province since the opioid crisis was declared in 2016. According to the report, 175 homeless people died between 2015 and 2016, a 140 per cent increase over 73 deaths in 2015. The province declared a state of emergency regarding the opioid crisis in the spring of 2016. "Certainly, we see some correlation between the sharp increase in the number of deaths involving homeless individuals and the increase that we saw at the end of 2016 with deaths involving overdoses," said Andy Watson, a spokesperson for the coroners service.

  • News
    CBC

    Windsor's wind turbine plant gets $60K fine for injured worker

    CS Wind, a wind turbine manufacturing plant in Windsor, has been fined $60,000 after a worker was injured while disassembling flanges to dispose as scrap metal.Flanges are wind tower sections formed of large metal rings.On Oct. 30, 2017, a worker was making cuts on a flange when a piece fell.The employee received a severe injury, which resulted in a permanent injury, according to the Ministry of Labour.The investigation revealed that CS Wind didn't provide workers with "information, instruction and or instruction with respect to a safe procedure for cutting wind tower sections."This is not CS Wind's first conviction.In 2016, the company was fined for an incident where a worker received multiple injuries "from the movement of components of a wind tower under construction."CS Wind was fined $60,000 in that case.Currently, the company is "in a state of shutdown," according to the ministry.CBC News reported on March 15, 2019 that workers had been laid off after a slowdown in work.The company first opened the Windsor location in 2011.

  • Calling all owner donors: pets needed for blood donations on Vancouver Island
    News
    CBC

    Calling all owner donors: pets needed for blood donations on Vancouver Island

    Finding a blood transfusion for a pet was much more difficult than Victoria resident Kady Savard ever imagined. Dog blood is different than human blood and is categorized based on size of the donor. Savard put the call out on social media looking for owners of dogs with compatible blood on Facebook.

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    Ontario police watchdog raps strip searches for those arrested, in custody

    Strip searches of suspects have become commonplace and are all too often unnecessary and even illegal despite sharp criticism of the practice going back almost two decades, one of Ontario's police watchdogs reported on Thursday. In a special analysis of the issue, the Office of the Independent Police Review Director says strip-search procedures across the province are inconsistent, poorly documented and often show a misunderstanding of the law. Director Gerry McNeilly calls the situation "intolerable" in light of a Supreme Court of Canada decision in 2001 that established the legal parameters for the intrusive searches.

  • Cleaning cloths clog Summerside sewage system
    News
    CBC

    Cleaning cloths clog Summerside sewage system

    The sewer system in Summerside, P.E.I., has been blocked about four times over the last month. "We had a few I'll call them foreign objects that shouldn't be in the sewer system clogging up our lift station pumps and causing them to not operate," said Greg Gaudet, municipal services director for the City of Summerside. Thick cleaning cloths flushed down toilets have been largely to blame, he said.

  • Snapshots of Labrador: A new CBC exhibit presents the best of the Big Land
    News
    CBC

    Snapshots of Labrador: A new CBC exhibit presents the best of the Big Land

    Labrador Morning had a busy year in 2018. CBC's Labrador Morning is starting a yearly photo exhibition, and is inviting you to send your best snaps of a story happening right now. Later in the year, the team hopes to stage the exhibit in other communities.

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    Montreal lawyer challenges order to euthanize pit bull involved in attack

    MONTREAL — A prominent Montreal lawyer was in court Thursday in an attempt to save a pit bull-type dog that attacked six people last summer from being put down.Anne-France Goldwater argued the section of the municipal bylaw that orders a dog to be euthanized once declared dangerous contravenes provincial animal welfare legislation.The Crown announced this week that there would be no criminal charges against the woman who was watching the dog when the attacks took place last August. She had agreed to take care of it when the owner had a medical emergency.Goldwater asked the Quebec Superior Court to allow the dog named Shotta, who was seized after the attack, to be sent to a specialized refuge in New York, where it would be kept away from the public and never adopted to a home.Goldwater, a prominent animal rights activist, acknowledged at the beginning of the hearing the animal in question had attacked people — including several children — and was "not the best of dogs."But she added it is often the most difficult cases that test the laws and rights society puts in place."We'll never advance our rights with the nice little neighbourhood dog who never does anything (wrong)," she told Justice Lukasz Granosik. "We test them in a difficult situation to see if the laws have claws and teeth."Goldwater said the evidence demonstrated the dog in the current case wasn't given a proper behavioural evaluation and its owner, who she represents, was shut out of the process.She said a portion of the city's animal control bylaw, which states that dogs must be put down after being deemed dangerous, should be declared "inoperative" because it contravenes provincial legislation that describes animals as "sentient beings" that have "biological needs."A lawyer for the City of Montreal countered municipal authorities followed all proper procedures following the attack.Alexandre Paul-Hus said a behavioural evaluation was not necessary in this case to deem the dog was dangerous, since it had attacked several people, including children."This is not a borderline case, it is not an ambiguous case," he said.Paul-Hus also took issue with Goldwater's argument that the bylaw is invalid, arguing nothing in Quebec's law forbids euthanizing an animal."The act of euthanasia, if it is done in a fair and dignified manner...is not a murder," he said. "It is not a crime nor an infraction."Among the victims were the two grandchildren of the woman watching the dog.The dog first attacked a four-year-old girl, wounding her in the head. The animal was then enclosed, but managed to escape and wounded the girl's seven-year-old brother in the arm later in the day.The dog's life was temporarily spared pending a police investigation.Outside the courtroom, Goldwater said the dog had never previously shown any aggression towards humans before that day, but suggested that in any case, an animal cannot be held responsible for its actions, nor punished like a human. She said many things can make a dog become dangerous, including a lack of proper socialization."If a dog is too dangerous for human company, don't keep the dog in human company," she said. "Put him in a refuge where he is safe."The Montreal SPCA, which has custody of the dog, supported Goldwater's request that the dog be transferred to the Road to Home Rescue in New York while the legal battle plays out.The judge said he would rule at a later date, but assured Goldwater and the SPCA representative that he would render a decision quickly out of concern for the animal's welfare.Morgan Lowrie, The Canadian Press

  • TSB finds 'significant' damage on freighter struck in Vancouver Harbour collision
    News
    CBC

    TSB finds 'significant' damage on freighter struck in Vancouver Harbour collision

    A spokesman from the Transportation Safety Board has provided CBC with updated information on a freighter collision in Vancouver Harbour. Marine Investigation manager Mohan Raman says the M.V. Pan Acacia suffered "significant" damage in the form of a two-metre long gash and cracked weld seam midship on the starboard side, as well as indentations along the same side, when it was struck by the M.V. Caravos Harmony just after midnight on March 17. Raman said the Pan Acacia is a single hulled freighter, not double hulled as was previously reported.

  • 'Thrones' star Emilia Clarke reveals close brushes with death
    News
    Reuters

    'Thrones' star Emilia Clarke reveals close brushes with death

    LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - "Game of Thrones" actress Emilia Clarke on Thursday revealed she suffered two brain aneurysms during her early years with the hit television show that left her convinced she would die. Clarke, 32, who plays Mother of Dragons Daenerys Targaryen in the medieval fantasy series, spoke of her two brushes with death for the first time in a personal essay for The New Yorker magazine. The British actress said her first brain aneurysm happened in early 2011 at age of 24, shortly after she finished filming the first season of "Game of Thrones".

  • Eurosceptic populists make gains in Dutch provincial elections after Utrecht attack
    euronews Videos

    Eurosceptic populists make gains in Dutch provincial elections after Utrecht attack

    A Dutch far-right party made gains in provincial elections on Thursday, according to an exit poll by the leading broadcaster NOS . Their win was possibly boosted by a suspected terrorist attack this week in the city of Utrecht. One of the most important impacts is that Prime Minister Mark Rutte from the centre-coalition VVD party will have to look for outside support to win Senate approval for laws passed by parliament. Provincial votes determine the composition in the Senate where Rutte’s government has now lost its majority. The biggest winner of the night was the eurosceptic Forum for Democracy party, run by 36-year-old Thierry Baudet, which holds just two seats in parliament after entering politics in 2016. Projections show that the new party will have an equal number of seats in Senate as Rutte’s VVD. Like many other populist politicians, Baudet opposes immigration and wants a “Dutch first” Netherlands. He’s also anti-European Union and thinks the Netherlands should leave the bloc.  Baudet, who did not stop campaigning after Monday’s attack in Utrecht, blamed the incident on the government’s immigration policies. A 37-year-old Turkish male was arrested on suspicion of carrying out the shooting, though police have not determined a motive. Pollster Maurice de Hond said the Utrecht attack boosted turnout among immigration opponents. Who is Rutte going to turn to now? Rutte is most likely to turn to the Green Left of Labour parties for outside support once the Senate reconvenes in May. The Prime Minister said he would be looking for support from "constructive" parties on either the left or the right. Baudet has already ruled out helping out Rutte.

  • Province announces $2.5M to buy equipment to help prevent, manage bedsores
    News
    CBC

    Province announces $2.5M to buy equipment to help prevent, manage bedsores

    The provincial government will spend $2.5 million to help with the treatment and prevention of pressure injuries in long-term care homes, but none of that support will include additional staff. Health Minister Randy Delorey made the announcement Thursday. The government will pay $1.68 million for 500 special air mattresses and 100 pressure redistribution cushions.

  • Father of Humboldt Broncos player lauds budget's $20M for highway improvements
    News
    CBC

    Father of Humboldt Broncos player lauds budget's $20M for highway improvements

    Chris Joseph says highway intersection improvements announced in Saskatchewan's latest budget won't bring back his son, but they will make roads safer for others. Jaxon Joseph was one of 16 people killed when the Humboldt Broncos bus collided with a semi at a Saskatchewan highway intersection nearly one year ago. "It is definitely a good thing," Chris Joseph said from his home in St. Albert, Alta., of the changes, announced Wednesday.

  • Brazil's ex-President Temer jailed, accused of heading 'criminal organization'
    News
    Reuters

    Brazil's ex-President Temer jailed, accused of heading 'criminal organization'

    Temer was president from 2016 to 2018, taking office after the impeachment of Dilma Rousseff, who he served under as vice president for six years. Prosecutors alleged that Temer was the leader of a "criminal organization" that took in 1.8 billion reais ($472 million) in bribes or pending future kickbacks as part of numerous schemes, including one related to the Angra nuclear power plant complex on the Rio de Janeiro coast and other state firms.

  • Calgary clinic tells patients unvaccinated children aren't welcome
    News
    CBC

    Calgary clinic tells patients unvaccinated children aren't welcome

    A Calgary obstetrics and gynecology clinic has received some backlash after posting a sign at its entrance asking patients not to bring unvaccinated children inside, but Dr. Fiona Mattatall says she has no plans to take it down. Mattatall and four other physicians who work at the clinic decided to put up the sign after the recent measles case in Calgary. "We met and decided that we wanted to protect our patients from exposure because we have patients who are at-risk," she told the Calgary Eyeopener.

  • 'We're free': Family calls for change after newborn apprehended by CFS in viral video is returned
    News
    CBC

    'We're free': Family calls for change after newborn apprehended by CFS in viral video is returned

    Family of a 10-week-old baby girl whose apprehension by Manitoba child protection workers was shared widely on social media say their prayers were answered when her custody was returned to them on Thursday — but they want to see changes to how the system deals with families like theirs.